Nasa validates 'impossible' space drive (Wired UK)

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entertainment-wonderland:

aljazeeraamerica:

Wi-Fi now available on the moon

There is now Wi-Fi on the moon. Scientists at MIT and NASA said last week they discovered how to transmit data to space by lasers – technology that could be used by future missions to Mars and other planets.
If future generations live or work on the moon, scientists say, a broadband connection would allow them to keep in touch with family and friends back on Earth.

Read more

If only there were people on the moon, then Comcast and Verizon could find a way to screw up the Internet on the moon too.


Guh….. That’s what I was theorizing about…. Guess I can stop bothering now.

entertainment-wonderland:

aljazeeraamerica:

Wi-Fi now available on the moon

There is now Wi-Fi on the moon. Scientists at MIT and NASA said last week they discovered how to transmit data to space by lasers – technology that could be used by future missions to Mars and other planets.

If future generations live or work on the moon, scientists say, a broadband connection would allow them to keep in touch with family and friends back on Earth.

Read more

If only there were people on the moon, then Comcast and Verizon could find a way to screw up the Internet on the moon too.

Guh….. That’s what I was theorizing about…. Guess I can stop bothering now.

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

prostheticknowledge:

SCiO

This is a bit future-shock …

A small consumer-level molecular scanner lets you analyze the objects around you for relevant information, from food calories or quality, medicine, nature etc … This could be the start of the Internet of Everything

The Kickstarter was launched yesterday and made it’s $200,000 goal within 24 hours - the potential for this tech is huge. Watch the video embedded below to see the potential:

Smartphones made it easy to research facts, capture images, and navigate street maps, but they haven’t brought us closer to the physical environment in which we live – until now. 

Meet SCiO. It is the world’s first affordable molecular sensor that fits in the palm of your hand. SCiO is a tiny spectrometer and allows you to get instant relevant information about the chemical make-up of just about anything around you, sent directly to your smartphone.

Out of the box, when you get your SCiO, you’ll be able to analyze food, plants, and medications.

For example, you can:

  • Get nutritional facts about different kinds of food: salad dressings, sauces, fruits, cheeses, and much more.
  • See how ripe an Avocado is, through the peel!
  • Find out the quality of your cooking oil.
  • Know the well being of your plants.
  • Analyze soil or hydroponic solutions.
  • Authenticate medications or supplements.
  • Upload and tag the spectrum of any material on Earth to our database. Even yourself !

You can find out more about the product at it’s Kickstarter page here

(via professor-zun)

69,580 notes

Tyson nails a conversation about genetic differences vs. social differences in people’s ability to pursue an interest professionally. The question was about why there aren’t more women in sciences, and although his answer was well versed, it was quite odd how he answered instead of the woman at the table (none other than Ann Druyan)…. (by Center for Inquiry)

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inothernews:

doulaness:

Just stumbled upon this tweet from February: Neil calling out Mental Floss for lightening his skin.

Ugh.

(via ready-the-archers)

18,547 notes

This “camera” uses ultrasound imaging techniques to create real-time, volumetric images of occlusions in arteries, but it’s built more like a miniature drum cymbal than a SLR. A donut-shaped silicon chip with a 1.5 millimeter diameter and 460 micron hole in the center houses sensing and transmitting circuitry and serves as the base of the diminutive device. A thin film on top of it flutters 0.00005 of a millimeter, creating sound waves which are captured by an array of 100 sensors on the chip, processed, and transmitted to an external video monitor at a rate of 60 frames per second via 13 gossamer cables that are threaded through a catheter.


 (via You Can Take Selfies of Your Aorta With This Mini Camera | Wired Design | Wired.com)

This “camera” uses ultrasound imaging techniques to create real-time, volumetric images of occlusions in arteries, but it’s built more like a miniature drum cymbal than a SLR. A donut-shaped silicon chip with a 1.5 millimeter diameter and 460 micron hole in the center houses sensing and transmitting circuitry and serves as the base of the diminutive device. A thin film on top of it flutters 0.00005 of a millimeter, creating sound waves which are captured by an array of 100 sensors on the chip, processed, and transmitted to an external video monitor at a rate of 60 frames per second via 13 gossamer cables that are threaded through a catheter.


(via You Can Take Selfies of Your Aorta With This Mini Camera | Wired Design | Wired.com)

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sixpenceee:

Before I get into it, just know the pictures just serve as visual representations, not actual pictures

Okay so anyway, evidence for this theory is the following:

THE FACT THAT HUMANS ARE SO HAIRLESS: 

Only two kind of habitats give rise to hairless animals, an aquatic one and a one below the ground (a naked mole rat for example)

.The suggestion that humans have become hairless to prevent overheating has been rendered false because hair can act like a defense against the sun.

This is why camels retain their fur even in the hot dessert environment. 

This is not true.

Cats, elephants, dogs, babirus, sphynx, and hippos all have less hair than we have. Humans are quite literally covered in hair, although some may have hair too thin or pale to be seen from more than a couple inches away.

OUR FAT CELLS

We have ten times the number of fat cells as expected in an animal our size. Only two types of animals have large fat cells: hibernating and aquatic ones. 

In hibernating it’s seasonal fat, but in aquatic it’s all year round. It’s unreasonable to think that we evolved this feature in land because large fat pockets would have just slowed us down. 

Primate babies are always born slender, but human babies start to develop fat even before birth. 

You have to be joking me. This is quite literally (again) not true at all. Not even close to being true. I can’t get over how completely, utterly, not-even-googled untrue this statement is.

WALKING ON TWO LEGS

So we’re the only mammals that have developed bipedalism. This is a surprise, because walking on 2 legs vs. walking on 4 legs is very disadvantageous. It’s slower, unstable, our organs are vulnerable to damage.

One theory is that if our habitat was flooded, we’d have to walk on two legs to keep our heads above the water.

The only animal who has ever evolved a pelvis like ours, the swamp ape, used this method. 

We are? Really? Really? Is it April Fools Day already? Because this has got to be a joke.

BREATHING

We have conscious control over our breathing. Ever other land animal doesn’t. Mammals like dolphins and seals also conscious control because it tells them how deep they are going to dive and they can estimate how much air they need to inhale.

Okay, this proves it, you thought it was April Fools Day and you’ve decided to play a huge joke on all of us. Well jokes on you, buddy, it’s February!

OTHER DIFFERENCES

Our body is so wasteful of salt and water. Think of tears and our way of sweating. Other land mammals don’t have this. Water mammals do however. 

"I’m just making stuff up now, I hope no one bothers to think critically about this or, I don’t know, look any of it up.”

Okay anyway I hope you learned something. 

Here’s a source and where you can find more information: X

For more interesting posts like this, go here: X

I’m not even going to get into your “sources.”

This was a hilarious joke though. Totally laughed my booty off a few times.

(Source: sixpenceee, via ready-the-archers)

133,816 notes

"Dark Matter Might Not Exist" (Weekend Feature)

astrodidact:

Dark Energy and Gravity - Yin and Yang of the Universe

This past 4th of July 2013, a European team of astronomers led by Hongsheng Zhao of the SUPA Centre of Gravity at the University of St Andrews presented a radical new theory at the RAS National Astronomy Meeting in St Andrews. Their theory suggested that the Milky…

WHHHHHHHHHHHOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

It’s almost like what I’ve been saying for three years now…………..

A lot of you took up pretty aggressive arguments against me, but failed to provide any convincing (or real) evidence. Just saying.

(via hal-ya)

61 notes

"Being a scientist means living on the borderline between your competence and your incompetence. If you always feel competent, you aren’t doing your job."

Carlos Bustamante

(via scienceisbeauty)

(via -iwilldestroyyou)

1,064 notes

colchrishadfield:

Good Morning! Need an Alka Seltzer? Here’s how they behave in space. (Don’s full video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgC-ocnTTto)

That’s insanely cool, thanks for sharing with us!

colchrishadfield:

Good Morning! Need an Alka Seltzer? Here’s how they behave in space. (Don’s full video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgC-ocnTTto)

That’s insanely cool, thanks for sharing with us!

687 notes

Your wireless router could be murdering your houseplants

sciencewalrus:

neverknwsbest:

well wifi sickness actually happens so maybe those people are just more sensitive to things we are all being hit by

2.4ghz is one of the most commonly used bands. It’s an unlicensed ISM band, meaning anyone can used it for whatever reason they want, and as such many technologies that we rely on today use it. Everything from video game controllers, to bluetooth, to home phones use one of the frequencies contained in the 2.4-2.499… band. It is not exclusive to wifi.

This “study” was preformed by high school students that did not repeat the experiments, and did not have consistent enough constants to be able to make a logical conclusion between the causation and correlation of the band to its effects on actual cell growth.

It’s an easy story to pick up on and sensationalize however, because using wireless anything has had a surge of those jabbering old tales about how "magical devil air waves" (as it is known to many elderly or otherwise uninformed people) do harm and cause damage— much the same that the myths of microwaves have had since their inception.

Also, another huge flaw, is that mobile phones, what they were attempting to do an experiment about, do not operate on 2.4GHz— at least not when wifi and bluetooth are switched off. The bands are 800/850/900/1800/1900/2100/2500MHz, not between 2400 and 2499MHz.

No one seems to notice that, either….Really, it seems anytime someone can’t understand something, and can’t chalk it up to some dribbling old man in the clouds, it becomes almost intrinsically bad for you. They don’t know why, and that’s good enough for them.

Misinformation; ignorance; sensationalism.

40 notes

neverknwsbest said: I thought in that article they said they did repeat the same results on the second trial.

Could you quote that for me? I checked it twice.

Also, another huge flaw, is that mobile phones do not operate on 2.4GHz, at least not when wifi and bluetooth are switched off. The bands are 800/850/900/1800/1900/2100/2500MHz, not between 2400 and 2499MHz.

No one seems to notice that, either….

0 notes

Your wireless router could be murdering your houseplants

neverknwsbest:

well wifi sickness actually happens so maybe those people are just more sensitive to things we are all being hit by

2.4ghz is one of the most commonly used bands. It’s an unlicensed ISM band, meaning anyone can used it for whatever reason they want, and as such many technologies that we rely on today use it. Everything from video game controllers, to bluetooth, to home phones use one of the frequencies contained in the 2.4-2.499… band. It is not exclusive to wifi.

This “study” was preformed by high school students that did not repeat the experiments, and did not have consistent enough constants to be able to make a logical conclusion between the causation and correlation of the band to its effects on actual cell growth.

It’s an easy story to pick up on and sensationalize however, because using wireless anything has had a surge of those jabbering old tales about how "magical devil air waves" (as it is known to many elderly or otherwise uninformed people) do harm and cause damage— much the same that the myths of microwaves have had since their inception.

Also, another huge flaw, is that mobile phones, what they were attempting to do an experiment about, do not operate on 2.4GHz— at least not when wifi and bluetooth are switched off. The bands are 800/850/900/1800/1900/2100/2500MHz, not between 2400 and 2499MHz.

No one seems to notice that, either….Really, it seems anytime someone can’t understand something, and can’t chalk it up to some dribbling old man in the clouds, it becomes almost intrinsically bad for you. They don’t know why, and that’s good enough for them.

Misinformation; ignorance; sensationalism.

(via rollership)

40 notes

wildcat2030:

‘Spooky action’ builds wormhole between ‘entangled’ particles
Physicists believe that quantum entanglement—which Albert Einstein referred to as “spooky action at a distance”—might be intrinsically linked with wormholes. Wormholes, hypothetical features of space-time, provide a much-faster-than–light shortcut from one part of the universe to another in popular science fiction. But here’s the catch: One couldn’t actually travel, or even communicate, through these wormholes, says Andreas Karch, a physics professor at the University of Washington. Quantum entanglement occurs when a pair or a group of particles interact in ways that dictate that each particle’s behavior is relative to the behavior of the others. In a pair of entangled particles, if one particle is observed to have a specific spin, for example, the other particle observed at the same time will have the opposite spin.
Wormhole connections
The “spooky” part is that, as past research has confirmed, the relationship holds true no matter how far apart the particles are—across the room or across several galaxies. If the behavior of one particle changes, the behavior of both entangled particles changes simultaneously, no matter how far away they are.
Recent research indicates that the characteristics of a wormhole are the same as if two black holes were entangled, then pulled apart. Even if the black holes were on opposite sides of the universe, the wormhole would connect them.
Black holes, which can be as small as a single atom or many times larger than the sun, exist throughout the universe, but their gravitational pull is so strong that not even light can escape from them.
If two black holes were entangled, Karch says, a person outside the opening of one would not be able to see or communicate with someone just outside the opening of the other.
“The way you can communicate with each other is if you jump into your black hole, then the other person must jump into his black hole, and the interior world would be the same,” he says.
‘Mathematical machineries’
The work demonstrates an equivalence between quantum mechanics, which deals with physical phenomena at very tiny scales, and classical geometry—”two different mathematical machineries to go after the same physical process,” Karch says. The result is a tool scientists can use to develop broader understanding of entangled quantum systems.
“We’ve just followed well-established rules people have known for 15 years and asked ourselves, ‘What is the consequence of quantum entanglement?’”
Karch is a co-author of a paper describing the research, published in November in Physical Review Letters. Kristan Jensen of Stony Brook, a coauthor, did the work while at the University of Victoria, Canada. Funding came from the US Department of Energy and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.
(via 'Spooky action' builds wormhole between 'entangled' particles | Futurity)

wildcat2030:

‘Spooky action’ builds wormhole between ‘entangled’ particles

Physicists believe that quantum entanglement—which Albert Einstein referred to as “spooky action at a distance”—might be intrinsically linked with wormholes. Wormholes, hypothetical features of space-time, provide a much-faster-than–light shortcut from one part of the universe to another in popular science fiction. But here’s the catch: One couldn’t actually travel, or even communicate, through these wormholes, says Andreas Karch, a physics professor at the University of Washington. Quantum entanglement occurs when a pair or a group of particles interact in ways that dictate that each particle’s behavior is relative to the behavior of the others. In a pair of entangled particles, if one particle is observed to have a specific spin, for example, the other particle observed at the same time will have the opposite spin.

Wormhole connections

The “spooky” part is that, as past research has confirmed, the relationship holds true no matter how far apart the particles are—across the room or across several galaxies. If the behavior of one particle changes, the behavior of both entangled particles changes simultaneously, no matter how far away they are.

Recent research indicates that the characteristics of a wormhole are the same as if two black holes were entangled, then pulled apart. Even if the black holes were on opposite sides of the universe, the wormhole would connect them.

Black holes, which can be as small as a single atom or many times larger than the sun, exist throughout the universe, but their gravitational pull is so strong that not even light can escape from them.

If two black holes were entangled, Karch says, a person outside the opening of one would not be able to see or communicate with someone just outside the opening of the other.

“The way you can communicate with each other is if you jump into your black hole, then the other person must jump into his black hole, and the interior world would be the same,” he says.

‘Mathematical machineries’

The work demonstrates an equivalence between quantum mechanics, which deals with physical phenomena at very tiny scales, and classical geometry—”two different mathematical machineries to go after the same physical process,” Karch says. The result is a tool scientists can use to develop broader understanding of entangled quantum systems.

“We’ve just followed well-established rules people have known for 15 years and asked ourselves, ‘What is the consequence of quantum entanglement?’”

Karch is a co-author of a paper describing the research, published in November in Physical Review Letters. Kristan Jensen of Stony Brook, a coauthor, did the work while at the University of Victoria, Canada. Funding came from the US Department of Energy and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

(via 'Spooky action' builds wormhole between 'entangled' particles | Futurity)

(via hal-ya)

197 notes